Now Playing Tracks

america-wakiewakie:

Caught On Tape: Fla. Cop Threatens To ‘Put A Round’ In Black Men During Traffic Stop | News One

Within the last two months, Eric Garner, 43, unarmed, was killed on July 17 by NYPD officer Daniel Pantaleo who placed him in an illegal chokehold while questioning him for allegedly selling untaxed cigarettes; John Crawford, 22, unarmed, was shot and killed on August 5 by two Ohio police officers, David Darkow and Sean Williams, in Walmart after he was spotted holding a toy rifle; 18-year-old Mike Brown, unarmed, was gunned down by Ferguson, Missouri police officer Darren Wilson while walking with a friend in his neighborhood; and Ezell Ford, 24, who was also unarmed, was shot and killed by unnamed officers in the LAPD on August 12.

In the wake of these tragic events and renewed intense conversations surrounding police brutality against Black men, a video  of police in Boynton Beach, Florida threatening to “put a round” through four Black men during a routine traffic stop has emerged and begun making the rounds on social media.

One of the occupants in the video records the interaction, even after the officer tells him to stop, to which he responds:

No, I have rights. I’m not intimidated. I have rights.

Sir, I’m recording your ass. What the f*ck you going to do?

B**ch, you’re on camera. What the f*cks wrong with you. Stupid ass cracker.

The driver of the car repeatedly asks the officer who stopped them for his badge number. The officer provides his name, but not the number, prompting the driver to attempt to take a picture of his badge. The officer slaps the phone out of his hand, pulls him from the car and places him face down on the ground.

That’s when another officer, presumably his partner or back-up rushes to the window, gun drawn, and says:

“I’ll put a round in your ass so quick,” with his weapon threw the window pointed directly at the men.

(Watch the Video Here) (Photo Credit: AmericaWakieWakie)

superopinionated:

ohdeargodbees:

wilwheaton:

konradwerks:

The situation is just intolerable.

There have been a lot of really insightful write-ups recently. A broader perspective—and I almost cringe to say—catch-all by Molly Crabapple left me gasping for breath. This write up, by Elizabeth Sampat giving her thoughts on an industry that’s very dear to me, delivered the final blow and left me in tears.

It’s really rare that I create from a place of grief. It’s just not how I operate. But it’s largely what I have openly felt for the last few days, and reflecting on it, it’s been there for far longer.

This quote from Elizabeth’s piece— “We should have a war memorial for all of the women we have lost to this. We should lay flowers and grieve and see our reflections in stone.”— struck a very literal chord in me.

So yeah, here it is. A place just for me where I can light a candle and remember all of the wonderful people I probably will never get the chance to meet.  Folks that have been driven away by these horrible fucks that have the audacity to think they know what gaming and community is about.

en memoriam.

I have never, in my life, been ashamed to call myself a gamer. Until now. These misogynist little shitbags are a disgrace to our community.

All of us who care about gaming need to step up and save our community, while there is still something about it that’s worth saving.

RIP women like me. This is beautiful.

I refuse to be added to or thought of as a casualty though. I can keep going. But those who couldn’t or can’t, you are missed. Your voices are missed. I hope I can help carry your memory forward and continue to say “never again”.

Until the game industry/community has active channels of support for survivors of rape and sexual assault in the industry, and mechanisms to prevent developers who commit rape and sexual assault from continuing to do that, in a way that is peaceful and brings about permanent positive change, I’m gonna have a real hard time believing shit about shit.

And this is just, like, one thing I see the deeply enmeshed communities of Game Industry and Consumers of Games (note how it’s often difficult to talk about the industry without also having to assume discussion of the community of fans) needing to address.

"Saving" or whatever is nice, but fundamental structural changes…f-fundamentally change things, and that will probably feel uncomfortable.

We know what white people (hi) and men, and especially white men, are like when they’re uncomfortable. They turn into misogynist, racist, entitled little shitbags. I don’t see that changing even if everyone sent Zoe a dollar for every word of abuse she’s received (which hey we should also do, where’s the Indiegogo to help pay for this woman’s long-term emotional health, if everyone’s so damn sorry?).

The hatred of women runs wide and deep in games, it won’t end when Zoe’s not getting harassed every day, it won’t be gone when Anita’s series is done, it wasn’t gone when I left games, it didn’t disappear when Maddy Myers stopped going to public fighting games tournaments, it didn’t go away when Jade Raymond stopped being the face of the Assassin’s Creed series (these are just the names off the top of my head, writing into the little XKit reblog window right now)

…and meanwhile FYI sexual assaults happen at and around all your fave big tent-pole gamer and game industry events, and throughout the industry all the time, because misogynist little shitbags don’t just PLAY games they also MAKE them. But who wants to report on a colleague, who *doesn’t* want to sign up for this sort of experience (but coming from your coworkers, and at work events)?

(But I’m supposed to have #1reasonwhy I’m excited a woman wants to work in that industry.)

fandomsandfeminism:

consultingsuperhusbands:

artmesohard:

Many cancer patients can be overwhelmed with the physical and emotional difficulties of their disease, and the loss of their hair from chemotherapy treatment certainly doesn’t help. Henna Heals, a rich community of nearly 150 henna tattoo artists worldwide established by a team of 5 women in Canada, helps women with cancer feel confident and beautiful again by drawing elegant henna crowns on their bare heads:

The intricate patterns that the artists create with all-natural henna paste are a unique and empowering substitute to the hats and wigs that many women use to cover their heads after losing their hair to chemotherapy. “For cancer patients, the henna crowns really are a healing experience,” claims Frances Darwin, the founder of Henna Heals. “This is all about them reclaiming a part of themselves that would normally be perceived as ill or damaged or not nice to look at and making it more feminine and beautiful.”

The traditional South-Asian temporary tattoos, which are made with 100% natural home-made henna paste, last for around two weeks and have no harmful side-effects. Henna Heals also offers henna services for special events and does belly painting for mother-to-be, but they always donate 10% of their proceeds to compensate the cost of the henna crowns they make for cancer patients.

I could yell ‘cultural appropriation’ right now but I don’t wanna because, fuck yeah, this is a great idea. And I’m gonna tell you why. 

In India, where I come from, in the Hindu community, henna is associated purely with religious or matrimonial ceremonies. During religious festivals, women wear it as a sign of not just celebration, but purity. Again, during weddings, the bride wears henna up to her elbows and up to her ankles, and, traditionally, there is a ‘mehendi (our word for henna that is applied on the skin) ceremony’ where the women dance and sing bawdy wedding songs and bless the new bride with fertility. The darkness of the mehendi is supposed to predict how deep the bond with the new husband will be, because, traditionally, marriages are arranged, so its a bit of a gamble, and women are forced to read signs into every little thing. A practice that is supposed to be for decoration then becomes a way to grade the new bride’s purity, chastity and the future happiness of her marriage. The same association with chastity and purity applies during religious ceremonies.

Whenever I apply mehendi at a someone’s wedding, I always feel a niggling of GUILT, and ANXIETY - for not being the ideal Hindu woman; for being neither chaste, or pure, or even remotely spiritual. And mehendi, despite its prettiness, is also associated with a certain rigid idea of womanhood, motherhood and femininity. I say BREAK THAT.

That’s why this beautiful, beautiful idea is a great way to unhinge leaf-paste (because that’s what it is!) from all sorts of medieval ideas about how women should be womanly. If it helps set anyone free, helps anyone feel pretty and proud, I say go for it.

Because that’s what this is - reclaiming an art practiced in a female space, democratizing it, opening it up, applying it on anyone and everyone, free of moral and value judgement. Bringing it back to the delight possibly felt by women in Asia millenia back when they giggled ‘Ooh, hey lemme draw a flower on you with that cute leaf-paste’. Reclaiming it for us, and for all our uses, in all our different lives. This makes me fiercely happy.

This is really beautiful.

We make Tumblr themes